Reality and Physics

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Reality and Physics

Post  taixyz1992 on Fri Dec 03, 2010 7:50 am

More customarily, the universe is defined as everything that exists, has existed, and will exist[citation needed]. According to this definition and our present understanding, the universe consists of three elements: space and time, collectively known as space-time or the vacuum; matter and various forms of energy and momentum occupying space-time; and the physical laws that govern the first two. These elements will be discussed in greater detail below. A related definition of the term universe is everything that exists at a single moment of cosmological time, such as the present, as in the sentence "The universe is now bathed uniformly in microwave radiation".

The three elements of the universe (spacetime, matter-energy, and physical law) correspond roughly to the ideas of Aristotle. In his book The Physics (Φυσικῆς, from which we derive the word "physics"), Aristotle divided τὸ πᾶν (everything) into three roughly analogous elements: matter (the stuff of which the universe is made), form (the arrangement of that matter in space) and change (how matter is created, destroyed or altered in its properties, and similarly, how form is altered). Physical laws were conceived as the rules governing the properties of matter, form and their changes. Later philosophers such as Lucretius, Averroes, Avicenna and Baruch Spinoza altered or refined these divisions[citation needed]; for example, Averroes and Spinoza discern natura naturans (the active principles governing the universe) from natura naturata, the passive elements upon which the former act.


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Re: Reality and Physics

Post  heroisthai on Tue Jan 18, 2011 4:56 am

The three elements of the universe (spacetime, matter-energy, and physical law) correspond roughly to the ideas of Aristotle. In his book The Physics (Φυσικῆς, from which we derive the word "physics"), Aristotle divided τὸ πᾶν (everything) into three roughly analogous elements: matter (the stuff of which the universe is made), form (the arrangement of that matter in space) and change (how matter is created, destroyed or altered in its properties, and similarly, how form is altered). Physical laws were conceived as the rules governing the properties of matter, form and their changes. Later philosophers such as Lucretius, Averroes, Avicenna and Baruch Spinoza altered or refined these divisions[citation needed]; for example, Averroes and Spinoza discern natura naturans (the active principles governing the universe) from natura naturata, the passive elements upon which the former act.




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